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Graffiti

65 thoughts on “Graffiti

    1. Good point ๐Ÿ˜‰ Yes, local people are clearly very fond of street art – minus the art. Scribbles are everywhere, but actual street art is rarely to be seen. It fascinates me that people vandalise public areas, which is probably why I keep on documenting the outrage…

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      1. Speaking about that,I was wondering about the area you live in.Why are people there so graffiti-crazy? I mean,there is graffiti literally everywhere!!! It’s a little bit like that in Mauritius,but the Czech Republic is in Europe and,I bet,even more developed and better-looking.Does this mean there are posh areas and not-so-posh areas?

        And while we’re at it,how do Czech people react to ”coloured” people? I’m very curious,because you seldom here about the country in the news.I mean,it’s one those countries where you just can’t picture a Chinese,an Indian or whatsoever living.I’m not asking so as to judge the people,but rather to get an idea of how they are; I only know the name,the capital and you,ha! ๐Ÿ˜€

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        1. Thank you for your thought-provoking and stimulating comment, as always! Well, I’m not sure to what extent my country is more developed than yours – there’s a huge difference between eastern and western Europe. We’re geographically in the middle, but historically and mentally we belong to the east – former Soviet Union satellites.

          There are surely posh and not-so-posh areas, but graffiti indeed seems to be everywhere. I guess that physical poverty goes hand in hand with mental poverty – people are bored and for lack of a more reasonable activity, they go out and vandalise public areas. I live in a lower middle-class area, in a block of flats, and there’s lot of vandalism around.

          As to the question of racism, the most populous minority here are Roma gypsies, and there is indeed a tension. The other minorities don’t attract racism, I think, for instance there are a lot of Asian people who typically run convenience shops or cheap clothes shops, but they assimilate well and are generally well liked.

          Hope this answers your questions! Thank you for making me think about it!

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          1. Oh,it’s you whom I should thank. ๐Ÿ™‚
            The more you answer my questions with such honest,the lesser the Czech Republic is a big interrogation mark to me.

            When you live in the middle of nowhere,you realise how much of the world eludes you…

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          2. Oh why, thank you! I’m glad we inspire each other ๐Ÿ˜‰ Actually, I live in the middle of nowhere too – in the middle of nowhere, or vacuum, that happens to be located the middle of Europe…

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      2. I’ve also checked where your country is.It’s pretty near Germany,for example.Does that mean you don’t pay much if you want to go to,say,Berlin? (A bit like British people don’t have to splash the cash to go to France.)

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        1. Oh, that’s interesting! I don’t think we have any special advantages when going to Germany – besides the obvious convenience that you can take a bus or a train because it’s not that far, so you don’t pay as much as you would pay to fly. By the way, we were talking about vandalism, in this respect you would probably like Germany, it’s much cleaner and neater than here – the difference is huge. The Germans are obviously much more developed and richer…

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      1. Well, there are artists and there are “artists”, I’ve always been a big fan of (good) graffiti, must be because of my days back in Beograd! ๐Ÿ™‚

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          1. An artist’s artist? Must confess that, although I court controversy with this comment, that I am a big fan of graffiti, although I understand that when it becomes too close for comfort it is not so cool…

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          2. Well, I like graffiti, but I don’t like vandalism, and it’s hard to converge these competing tendencies… And I always like to see that some effort went into the graffiti – which is not the case in the simple scribbling kind…

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          3. Well, thank you for your kind suggestion, but I’m afraid there’s only that much that I’m ready to do for blogging… Blogging from behind the bars won’t do, I think ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

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          4. Could probably only be done using a mobile concealed behind a false brick in the toilet stall anyway, and even then only if there is a functioning door.

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      1. Shall I be upset for my misplaced comment just to unease you?
        I think you should seriously consider this option and collaborate with the police as well! Lol

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        1. However tempting the idea of shooting vandals with the blessing of the police looks, I would hate to be shot (or vandalised) myself – so I don’t think I’m doing it ๐Ÿ˜ฎ Also, I don’t really complain about your misplaced compliment ๐Ÿ˜‰

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  1. Its funny I don’t like graffiti but when seen in photos like yours I quite like the effect and it does become art.. I guess its in the eye of the beholder or the way it is photographed that in turn the photo becomes the art that makes me feel that way…hmm? ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. You put is so well! You take on the “what is art” question makes perfect sense, and I’m flattered that you think I contributed somehow to transforming vandalism into art ๐Ÿ™‚

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  2. I wouldn’t want those walls in my backyard, but you really did somehow make it look like cool. I think the collection of photos helped to give it a more artful impact. Nice work!

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    1. I sort of like the “goal” thing too, at least some actual effort went into creating it. Yes, football is quite popular here, and so is hockey. I’m a fan of neither though ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

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      1. Yeah, you’re right. Hockey is our national game, but majority don’t know even the basic rules. Cricket is huge here, so if Indians did graffiti, it’d read something like ‘CENTURY!!!’.

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          1. The only ‘graffiti’ you see on our walls is the red stain that is left when you chew and spit ‘paan’ (which is a type of nicotine), or maybe the ash of cigars. I wish we had some real graffiti.

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          2. Oh! That’s interesting! Thank you for enlightening me, I know very little about your world, which is shameful. I always love to learn more through you ๐Ÿ™‚

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          3. I know very little of the rest of he world too. Thanks to your stunning visuals, I’ve this great desire to visit Europe.
            Oh, and also, as a legal alternative for graffiti, we have what we call ‘street art’. Paintings of animals, cultural treasures, dances…you know it. Though it shows great skill of the artists, it is quite boring.

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          4. Oh, another very interesting piece of knowledge about your land! I see what you mean – I would probably too find this kind of street art boring. Too regular and too predictable, I suppose. Well, I hope you’ll be able to travel and see for yourself all that you’d like to see!

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    1. That’s a compliment to the creators of the street art (or “art” in some cases), I wish I could pass it on to them… But since I can’t, I’ll claim all the credits for myself! Ha ๐Ÿ˜€

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